Brett's Blog

Just some ramblings.

FREEZE! Busted by the Fridge. The ways that tech influences writing fiction, making movies, and busting criminals.

One interesting investigation I had was that of a murder-for-hire in one city that the suspect used a Google search to find the victim’s home address in another city.  Simple enough crime to plan.  Google the name, find the address, do the hit.  Except in this particular case, although the suspect Googled the correct name, there were two people with the same name in the same city and he picked the wrong one.  I called this case my “Sarah Connor” case.

Fortunately, we intercepted the hit before it happened and prevented a random murder on the wrong person (as well as preventing the murder of the ‘right’ person).  In a basic sense, the suspect used the technology of one of the most advanced computer systems in the world (Google….) to attempt a murder only to choose the wrong name in a Google search hit.  This type of criminal incompetence and carelessness is commonplace.  It is also the way that most get caught. 

On the other end of the spectrum, we have Hollywood’s version of high tech crime fighting.  Minority Report with Tom Cruise showed us that not only can crimes be solved with technology, but that crimes can also be prevented with technology.  As for the technology used in the movie, it could have only been more accurate had a predictive analysis computer system been used in place of the fortune-telling humans (“Precogs”) in a big bathtub.

In a turn-key surveillance system, no person is anonymous.  Whether it is a private business or government agency, no one is immune from potentially being watched, tracked, or reported.  Private businesses use facial recognition for both improving customer service by detecting your mood through facial expressions as well as preventing crime.

“…faces of individuals caught on camera are converted into a biometric template and cross-referenced with a database for a possible match with past shoplifters or known criminals.” https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2016/mar/03/revealed-facial-recognition-software-infiltrating-cities-saks-toronto  

Criminals who try to avoid using technology are severely limited on the type of crimes they can commit.  That’s a good thing.  A drug dealer without a cell phone is like a taxi cab driver without a taxi.  It is part of the business and can be tracked, traced, monitored, intercepted, and forensically examined.  Technology is a natural and required part of any criminal’s operations.  Criminals not using technology are ineffective as criminals, for the most part.

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Never a shortage of examples

I have given 20 presentations this year and that was only in the first half of 2016 (although, I have not scheduled anything for the remainder of the year to finish some projects).

In each of the presentations, whether the attendees were parents, children, law enforcement, or digital forensics analysts, I have always been able to give really good examples of compromises.  On the day of the presentation or day before, I search for a recent breach and will most always find a good one.  If I search a day after the presentation, I sometimes find a new breach that would have also been a good example of a hacking incident.

So for the cybercrime preventation talks, I tell everyone that anyone can be a victim no matter what you do.  Sometimes you are specifically targeted and other times, you fall into a group of victims from a third party breach.  And the more 'third party' accounts you have, the more risk of having your personal data exposed.  For example, if you have a T-Mobile phone, Premera for health insurance, applied for a government security clearance, shop at Home Depot, and ate at Wendy's, you potentially have had your personal data or credit card information compromised five times by doing absolutely nothing wrong.

If you are targeted, even if you do everything right, you can have your personal information breached.  This applies even to CEOs, like the CEO of Twitter....and Facebook...and the CIA...Most likely, as the Internet of Things heat up and everything gets connected to the Internet, our risk will skyrocket to the point that the only people who don't have their personal information compromised are have been living on a mountain all their lives...with no electricity...and no credit cards...or car...or phone...  For the rest of us, it is probably just a matter of time.    As for me...my ID has been stolen once and I seem to get notice letters from services about a new breach on a regular basis. The good news is that I always have plenty of great examples to talk about.

 

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I'm just a Tor exit node! I'm just a Tor exit node!

I'm just a Tor exit node!  I'm just a Tor exit node!

Never thought I would still see this happening…

http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/seattle-police-raid-home-privacy-activists-who-maintain-tor-anonymity-network-node-1552524

I have personally seen warrants served on the wrong address on two occasions.  The first was a drug investigation where the lead detective went to the wrong door to an apartment.   The warrant was correct in having the correct address, but the detective didn’t take the time to check the numbers on the door…

The second time I witnessed a wrong door entry was when the lead detective had the wrong address on both the search warrant and affidavit.  The detective never even corroborated the information to find the right address.  Basically, the detective looked down the street and picked the house she thought was the drug dealer’s house.  After SWAT kicked in the door and broke a few things in the process, it took all of 5 minutes to realize that it was the wrong house.  The drug dealer was on the next street over…the victim house got a new door from Home Depot and carpet cleaning paid for by the task force.  

Both of these warrants taught me something that I will never forget.  Before you kick in the door, make sure you got the right door.  After you make sure you got the right door, make sure again.  Then ask your partner to double-check that you got the right door. Then get a warrant and kick it in if the suspect doesn’t open it for you.

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Barking up the Encryption Tree. You're doing it wrong.

Barking up the Encryption Tree.  You're doing it wrong.

There always comes a time when an obscure, yet important concept, leaves the technical world and enters the main stream.  Recovering deleted files was one of those where we pretty much knew all along not only that it can be done, but that we have been doing it all along. The Snowden releases were another aspect of ‘yeah, we knew this all along, but the GFP (general f’ing public) was oblivious.

Encryption is just the most current ‘old’ thing to make the limelight.  Whenever something like this happens, there are ton of people ringing the end-of-the-world bells, clamoring that national security will be lost, and personal freedoms take a back seat to everything.  It happens all the time and when it happens, there is a fire to make new laws on top of thousands of other laws, in which the promise of better safety and security is as strong as a wet paper bag holding your groceries on a windy and rainy day.

b2ap3_thumbnail_bancalifornia.JPG

Legally, it is super easy to ban, control, and/or regulate encryption. A stroke of the pen with or without citizen oversight can make it happen quickly and painlessly.  One signature on the last page of a law that is a ream in size is all it takes.

Practically, it is impossible to completely eliminate or control or regulate encryption.  The only thing laws will do is restrict the sale of encryption products by corporations.  Encryption exists in the minds of mathematical practitioners and can be recreated over and over again. You can't blank out someone’s brain (I hope not…).  Encryption is available everywhere on the Internet, from software programs that are FREE and OPEN SOURCE to download and even in TOYS that can be bought off Amazon.com.  These 'toys' work by the way.

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The four corners of the Apple v FBI encryption debacle

The four corners of the Apple v FBI encryption debacle

If only the FBI had picked a case where the issue was clear cut…that would make this encryption issue so much easier.

  1. The FBI doesn’t want Apple to simply “unlock” the phone.

Apple (and just about every other high tech company) has been unlocking devices and allowing access to data for law enforcement for decades.  That’s not the issue here.  The FBI wants the encryption to be broken. They want software to be rewritten or written that compromises security features. That’s a lot different than just unlocking a device.  That request breaks security.  Worse yet, it sets a precedent.  Law enforcement knows about precedent setting laws. Sometimes it is good, but sometimes it is not.

  1. It’s not the end of the world if encryption is broken.

Our lights will still turn on. Cars will still run.  Kids will still be able to go to school.  However, online payment systems will be as protected as a wet paper bag, secure communications will be as secure as Windows 3.1, and anything you send electronically is fair game to hackers (and government).  But don’t worry. If encryption is banned or broken, there will still be those able to use encryption (hint: one is government and the other is not law-abiding citizens).

  1. “Terrorist will Go Dark” is the best marketing ever created by government. 

The only time terrorists are not operating in the dark is when they use social media in the open, print terrorism training manuals (which are then posted online), and killing people in the open.  Plus, they still have to drive, fly, walk, eat, sleep, talk, go to the doctor, read a book, watch TV, and surf the Internet.  Terrorist and criminals have all the faults of ‘regular’ folks like complacency, laziness, incompetence, and bad luck when they plan and commit terrorist acts.  I've published two books on catching criminals (and terrorists) with online and forensic investigations.  You can put both books in the hands of a terrorist and the methods to find and catch them will still work.  "Going dark"? If a criminal or terrorist can do all the things needed to carry out their devious plans in encrypted emails ONLY, their plans are going to stink.  Planning an attack or conspiring to commit a crime requires way more than sending encrypted emails.  Working undercover in criminal organizations did teach me a thing or two in how it really works and how they really think and plan.

  1. You have nothing to hide, so what’s the big deal?

The government claims that since you cannot build a house that is impenetrable, you should not have use of encryption that can’t be broken.  Well..if I could make my home impenetrable, you bet I would. If I could buy a safe that was unbreakable, I would.  They just don’t exist.  It’s not that I have anything illegal to hide in a safe, but I don’t want anyone to steal what I have.  It’s not that I have anything top secret in an email, but I just don’t want strangers reading what I am sending to a friend, or to a business colleague.  The point is NOT having something to hide, but rather, NOT hanging my underwear in the front yard on a clothesline for anyone to see or steal (that is, if they wanted to steal my undies…).

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Let's not go all Patriot Act on this Apple - FBI encryption thing.

Let's not go all  Patriot Act on this Apple - FBI encryption thing.

I’ve been involved in about a half dozen conversations, three different email threads, and twice as many emails with friends and clients about this Apple – FBI encryption issue.   It seems to be a divided opinion with no compromise, at least as far as I can see.

 

FBI's Fight With Apple Over Encryption May Erode European Trust in US - Newsweek

http://news.google.com Sat, 20 Feb 2016 19:24:00 GMT

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Apple. Oranges. And Encryption.

Apple. Oranges. And Encryption.

One of the hottest topics currently is the FBI vs Apple battle over encryption, in that the FBI wants Apple to rewrite their operating system in order for law enforcement to bypass Apple’s encryption.  The arguments on both sides are strong. Law enforcement must have the ability to bypass encryption in the name of national security.  Conversely, consumers (in the USA at least) are afforded protections in the Constitution against unreasonable search and seizure.  The third part of this argument is security and safety of ALL electronic data.  If the legal argument stands that encryption is outlawed, that puts all data at risk of being compromised by criminals, disgruntled employees, and lackadaisical custodians of data.

Apple Fights Order to Unlock San Bernardino Gunman's iPhone - New York Times

http://news.google.com Thu, 18 Feb 2016 02:59:37 GMT

New York TimesApple Fights Order to Unlock San Bernardino Gunman's iPhoneNew York TimesApple executives had hoped to resolve the impasse without having to rewrite their own encryption software. They were frustrated that the Justice Department had aired its demand in public, according to an industry executive with knowledge of the case ...Google's CEO just sided with Apple in the encryption debateThe VergeOn Apple, the FBI, encryption, and why you should be worriedVentureBeatApple, The FBI And iP ...

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What is this thing "privacy" you speak of?

What is this thing "privacy" you speak of?

 

I luckily missed being born into the Internet generation.  Facebook creeped me out with the amount of information demanded to create an account.  It took me all of 1 minute to create an account, 5 minutes to decide to delete it, and then two hours to figure out how. That was years ago and I still receive email reminders from Facebook to re-join with all my information still in the deleted  account, as if I never deleted it. If you ever wondered what Mark Zuckerberg thought of Facebook users, you may want to take a look...http://www.businessinsider.com/well-these-new-zuckerberg-ims-wont-help-facebooks-privacy-problems-2010-5 

Perhaps a decade of working undercover has made me ultra-paranoid on personal information. At the time of doing UC work, I had little concern of sitting in an illegal business, having dinner with an organized crime figure and having one of his goons run me through Google, because there was no Google when I first started. That changed before I left the narc world and an undercover friend of mine was identified with Internet searches (while he was in the midst of a group of bad guys). If I was still doing undercover work, I'd no longer be doing undercover work. Thanks Google...

I can imagine that being born into the Internet age means never knowing what privacy is, nor have any concern about it all. Kids are literally texting in grade school, Facebooking in middle school, and blogging by high school.  Every generation now willfully gives up every aspect of their lives on social media and to buy some gadget online.

So when I see that the majority of people could care less about their most intimate and private details of their lives, it gives me pause. If you don’t think your Internet searches and web browsing is intimate, take a look at your web history and tell me that you don’t have some secrets in what you look at that you wouldn’t want anyone else to know about you. Health, wealth, and interests. How much more intimate can you get?

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